Tag Archives: sailor

Sailor Jentle Miruai (Seaweed Indigo) Fountain Pen Ink Review

Sailor Jentle: Four Seasons
Miruai (Seaweed Indigo)
Fountain Pen Ink Review

– Handwritten Review –

 

Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-5Notes:
Sailor recently made some changes to their ink lineup, including the addition of this one, called Miruai. The full name (get ready for it…) is Sailor Jentle Four Seasons Miruai – Seaweed Indigo. Nomenclature aside, it’s a great dark teal that is accurately described in the name. There is a tiny bit of shading, showing off the nice blue color in shallower pools of ink. On point with the rest of the Sailor inks I’ve tried, the flow is great and it is nice and smooth. I really like Sailor’s ink bottle design, it has an internal cone that collects ink when you flip the bottle upside down. This ink catcher makes filling any pen easy, even when you are at the bottom of the bottle. The color is much different from the other green Sailor ink I have (Epinard) and it’s dark enough to be used everyday without getting stares. Thank you to JetPens for sending over the bottle for review!

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Check out JetPens for tons of awesome Japanese pens and stationery. Free shipping on orders over $25, and hitting that is pretty easy with all the great stuff they have. Stop by!

Pros:

  • Smooth
  • Saturated
  • Unique Color
  • Smells Good
  • Nice Bottle Design

Cons:

  • Nothing!

Photos (click to make huge):

Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-1 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-2 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-3 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-4 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-5 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-6 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-7 Sailor Miruai Green Fountain Pen Ink Review-8
Gallery:

Thanks again to JetPens for sending this over to review, check out their site for more info on the pen!

 

Disclaimer: This ink was provided to me as a review unit, free of charge, by JetPens. I was not compensated for this review, and this did not have any effect on my thoughts and opinions about the product. Thank you for reading!

2014 – The Year In Review(s)

Top 10 Fountain Pen Reviews of 2014

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-2

I had a lot of fun doing the year-end roundup last year, so I figured I would do it again. Some pens have maintained their presence in the top 10 list and with good reason. Each of these posts got the most page views out of all of the posts I’ve made this year. The blog has continued to grow, and there were twice as many visitors and twice as many page views as there were last year. There were well over HALF A MILLION PAGE VIEWS and I want to thank you guys so much for checking out the site! Don’t forget to subscribe to the site using the “subscribe” box located in the right hand menu to get emailed every time I make a post!

So here we go, the Top 10 posts of 2014:

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-410. Buying a Grail Pen

One of my favorite posts, this guide to buying a “grail pen” ended up being very popular. I go through my system of deciding what the right pen is, the process of freeing up some funds, slimming down my collection and obtaining the pen.

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-149. and 8. Rotring Rapid Pro Ballpoint / 800 Pencil

This is the first of three Rotring posts that made the top ten list. The Rapid Pro Ballpoint is a slimline pen with a metal body and a knurled grip that looks and feels great. Admittedly, it didn’t see too much use following the review. The pen takes a Parker style cartridge and uses a click mechanism to deploy the writing point. The number 8 spot went to the Rotring 800 mechanical pencil. It’s of very high quality, also features a knurled grip – but has a retractable tip and gold accents.

Click here to check out the Rapid Pro review.
Click here to check out the  Rotring 800 Pencil review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-127. Lamy Safari Fountain Pen

The Lamy Safari was my first fountain pen, and it is still one of my favorites. It makes a great starter pen and really helped me in narrowing down what nib size I like due to the relatively inexpensive swappable nibs. The modern design still resonates with me and there is usually at least one inked up Safari in my arsenal. I picked up this discontinued Griso Grey model at the DC show for only $15!

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-96. Tactile Turn Mover / Shaker

The Mover and Shaker are two of my favorite machined pens. They take a huge range of refills and I love the grip pattern machined into the pen. They look and feel great, and they’re now available in a ton of different colors and materials.

Click here to check out the original review.

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review5. Rotring 600 Lava

The Rotring 600 Lava was an awesome looking pen. I say was, because I no longer have it. It wasn’t seeing as much use as it should and I’m more of a user than a collector. The pen was sold to help fund my Nakaya purchase and while it was nice, I don’t miss it one bit. The pen is long-discontinued and can be found on eBay.

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-84. Seven Seas Tomoe River Pad

The Seven Seas Tomoe pad remains on the list, and for good reason. The silky smooth, fountain pen friendly paper is some of the best out there. It’s impossibly thin and is a pleasure to write with. I photographed the Seven Seas Writer journal instead of the pad again. Both are full of the same paper, but this one has ruling and is bound like a book. Check them out at Nanami Paper.

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-133. Sailor Professional Gear Imperial Black Fountain Pen

The stealthiest pen of all. When this was announced I knew I needed to have one. Don’t feel like spending $400? Do some homework and find a retailer in Japan. I got the pen for much less off of eBay straight from Japan than I would have had I purchased it from the States. I haven’t been using this pen as much, but I couldn’t bring myself to get rid of it. I got the fine nib adjusted at the Long Island Pen show to slightly increase the ink flow and smoothness. It’s a great writer, and this post makes me want to go ink it up now.

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-102. Pocket Notebooks / Fountain Pen Friendly

This post was another fun one to write and I’m glad it made it onto the top 10 list. The post outlines what “fountain pen friendly” really means when dealing with pocket notebooks. Check the post out to see the differences!

Click here to check out the original review.

2014 Fountain Pen Year in Review(s)-111. Lamy 2000 Fountain Pen

Once again, the top post is the Lamy 2000. It’s still my favorite pen and it is still always inked and within reach. I absolutely love the design and writing experience. The 2000 is one of the first “expensive” pens people buy and I’m not surprised that the review is as popular as it is. Look for an updated review of the 2000 in the coming months!

Click here to check out the original review.

Conclusion

This was another great year for the blog. Thank you all for your continuing support and readership, it means the world. Even with a lower post count this year, the blog has still grown and continues to do so. I’d also like to thank the sponsors of the site – JetPens, Pen Chalet, and all of the independent retailers and companies that have sent me products to review for providing me with a steady stream of goods to review! I have a lot of great content in the pipeline, so make sure to come back and check it out!

Have a safe and happy new year!

Best,

Ed Jelley

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[Guest Post] Sailor 1911 Matte Black Full Size with a Naginata Togi MF Nib

[Guest Post] The Sailor 1911 Matte Black Full Size with a Naginata Togi MF Nib

Another awesome guest post by Susan Pigott! You may know her from her own blog, Scribalishess! Her photography, handwriting, and reviewing skills are top notch. If you like what you see here, make sure to go check out more on her site! Here’s Susan’s review of the The Sailor 1911 Large Matte Black Fountain Pen with an incredible Naginata Togi MF nib. Enjoy!

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Review Ink: Diamine Ancient Copper

Specs:

Description:  A Sailor 1911 Full Size in Matte Black with rhodium accents fitted with a Naginata Togi MF Nib

Nib:  21K Gold Naginata Togi MF

Filling Mechanism:  Cartridge/Converter

Weight: 23.7 grams

Measurements:  5.5 inches in length, capped; 4 and 3/4 inches uncapped; and 6 inches posted

Color Options: Black with gold trim; Black with rhodium trim, Burgundy with gold trim, Black luster, Matte Black with gold trim, Matte Black with rhodium trim and metal section, Naginata-Togi Gin-sensuji with Rhodium Trim, Naginata-Togi Ribbed Black with Gold Trim,Naginata-Togi Ribbed Black with Rhodium Trim, Naginata-Togi Ribbed Burgundy with Rhodium Trim, Black Realo with gold trim, Burgundy Realo with gold trim.

Handwritten Review Scans:

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Intro/About: 

I’ve been eyeing Naginata Togi nibs for quite some time now. I’ve always been fascinated with Sailor specialty nibs, and the Togi is the most basic (and least expensive) of the specialty nibs. I bought this pen from a seller on FPN for about $100 off the price listed at Classic Pens ($416). The seller had bought it from Classic Pens, so the nib was tuned by John Mottishaw. I was thrilled because I almost bought this very pen at the full price.

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Ed already reviewed a Sailor Professional Gear 1911, so I’m not going to focus much on the pen itself, though my model is a bit different. This review is all about the nib.

Appearance and Packaging: 

My Sailor 1911 came in a blue, rectangular clamshell box with literature about the pen and Sailor’s specialty nibs. Included were one ink cartridge and a converter.

The matte black version with rhodium trim is subtle and beautiful. I usually like gold-trimmed pens, but the rhodium matches the matte black perfectly. I honestly have too many black, cigar-shaped pens in my collection, but the matte black makes this pen stand out from the crowd. It’s classy, like Bond, James Bond.

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Nib Performance and Filling System:

The nib is what truly makes this pen something special.

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The Naginata Togi nib allows for a great deal of line variation depending on the angle of the pen to the paper. It is an unusually-shaped nib (see photos), and it has a longer than usual tip. It’s a 21K nib and is pretty rigid. You’re not going to get any flex while writing with this nib. The line variation comes from how you hold the pen. In the written review, I held the nib in my normal writing position, which is about 45 degrees, and I found the nib wrote beautifully. You can see differences in line width when I held the pen at a 90 degree angle, a 45 degree angle, and a super low angle (as close to the paper as I could hold it).

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Most of the Sailor specialty nibs are made for Japanese-styles of writing and calligraphy. But I wanted one for writing Hebrew since the horizontal strokes need to be thicker than the vertical strokes. (In real life I’m a professor of Old Testament and Hebrew). Even though I have a Hebrew nib from Richard Binder, it’s got a very narrow width and, unless I write tiny, I can’t see much variation between the horizontal and vertical strokes. The Naginata Togi does quite well, though I still need to practice making the Hebrew look good. I sure wish I could do Hebrew calligraphy.

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I admit I was nervous about buying a Sailor specialty nib. When you go the page on Classic Pens, the specialty nibs are almost overwhelming. They are amazingly intricate, and I was afraid I would find the Naginata Togi to be ridiculously broad. I even called and asked about the nibs and was told they are not for everyone. But I am a believer in this nib. I’m amazed at how smoothly it writes. I love the versatility it has depending on the angle you’re writing.

One concern I had is that the Naginata Togi nib puts down lots of ink when you’re writing broad. I was afraid the feed and the converter wouldn’t be able to keep up. So far, everything has been perfect, though I expect to refill this pen more often than most.

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Feel:

The Sailor 1911 full size feels great in the hand. It’s not a heavy pen. It is smooth as silk but not slippery. I don’t post my pens, but I tried writing with it posted and, for me at least, posting ruins the balance. If you want line variation, you have to hold the pen at different angles. Some angles are quite uncomfortable (such as trying to write super fine at 90 degrees). Other angles are easier on the wrist, but the lower you go, the slower you have to write.

 

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Pros:

  • The 1911 in Matte Black is a gorgeous pen. It is sleek and elegant and the rhodium trim complements it perfectly.
  • The pen feels good in the hand and is neither too heavy nor too light.
  • The Naginata Togi nib is a useful departure from a typical nib. I can see artists using this nib for sketching since you can get such wonderful line variation. For me, it works great as a general writer and it enhances my Hebrew printing.

Cons:

  • I prefer piston filler pens. The Sailor converter only holds .5ml of ink. You can get the Sailor Realo instead, but it only holds .9ml. Currently the Realo only comes in Black and Burgundy with gold trim. So, if you want the matte black, you have to go with the 1911 or Pro Gear.
  • The pen looks rather ordinary and plain. I like colorful pens. But the matte black makes it stand out from other black, cigar-shaped pens and the rhodium trim is different from my other pens, all of which have gold accents.
  • The Naginata Togi nib may not suit everyone’s tastes. If you can try one before you buy, that’s the best thing to do. I definitely wouldn’t go larger than the MF Togi. I’ve read that the medium and broad versions are like writing with Magic Markers.

 

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Conclusion:

All in all, I am very pleased with my Sailor 1911 Naginata Togi. My fears about the nib were unwarranted and, in fact, I am crazy about it. I love how it looks, how it writes, and that it is versatile enough that I can write in my journal or write Hebrew or both (because I totally write in Hebrew in my journal . . . not).

Gallery:

 

 

2013 – The Year In Review(s)

Hey everyone!

I wanted to do a year end wrap of of my post popular posts. Instead of just linking to them, I decided I’d have a little fun and do a quick reshoot of everyone together.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorThe photos were taken with my Olympus PEN E-P3, M. Zuiko 17mm f1.8 lens, and processed with Aperture 3 using the VSCO Film 02 Kodak Portra 400 VC film emulation. Something a little different than what I usually do on the site. I’ve also included an update blurb / mini review on each item.

So here we go, the Top 10 posts of 2013:

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorRunner up: Nock Co. Lookout Pen Case

This one was SO close to the Top 10, I had to include it. Nock Co. – created and successfully Kickstarted by Brad Dowdy (The Pen Addict) and his business partner and master seamster Jeffrey Bruckwicki has been protecting my pens for the past few months. They Kickstarter orders are in the process of being fulfilled and they look great. Watch out in 2014 for Nock Co.’s retail site / total pen case domination.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor10. Pilot Iroshizuku Fuyu-Syogun

Still one of my favorite inks. Since getting it back in the beginning of the year, it’s seen some heavy rotation. I haven’t had it loaded up as much recently as I used to, but it’s a great ink. Awesome performance and a really nice bluish grey makes Fuyu-Syogun versatile and interesting to write with. If you’re looking for a grey ink, then I highly recommend this one.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor9. Tomoe River Writing Pad from Nanami Paper

This one’s picked up a few stickers since my first review of it. Tomoe River paper took 2013 by storm and for good reason. It’s the thinnest paper I have written on and some of the smoothest and best behaved. I like throwing a sheet of Doane paper behind the sheet I’m writing on for extra organization. The thin paper is very sheer, but ink doesn’t even think about bleeding or feathering. It’s an awesome paper product that every fountain pen enthusiast needs to check out. I now need to have Tomoe Paper on hand, it’s just that good.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor8. Sailor Sapporo Fountain Pen

The Sailor Sapporo is a great little pen. My specimen has an extra fine nib and writes about as smooth as a nib so fine can. It’s nice and small when capped, but comfortable when posted. I got mine for a steal ($50) off the Fountain Pen Network classifieds. Is it worth the full asking price? Maybe not, but keep an eye out for a used model and you won’t be let down. Usage has dwindled since getting it, but it’s my finest writing pen. I like having a nib that small available when I need it.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor7. Pilot Metropolitan Fountain Pen

Another pen that gained great popularity in 2013 is the Pilot Metropolitan. I still can’t believe that this pen is only $15. It’s buttery smooth, comes with a converter, and is solidly constructed out of metal. It’s a great pen for beginners as well as serious collectors. The nib is also able to swap with the budget-priced Pilot Penmanship and Plumix – adding more options to the pen at a low price. I love my Metropolitan. This pen has undoubtedly given the Lamy Safari a run for it’s money as the best beginner pen. It still holds up from the original review, and no other pen has been able to match the value.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor6. Pilot Iroshizuku Kon-Peki

Here’s my favorite blue ink. It’s bright, performs well, and is a pleasure to look at. The bottle is beautiful as well. One sample, and it’s hard to not buy the bottle. I really like this ink in my Montblanc 149’s medium nib – it washes out easily too. It’s a great ink all around, and my favorite of the Iroshizuku line. I still use Kon-Peki all the time, and it’s usually in at least one pen.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor5. Pilot Vanishing Point Fountain Pen

Technically the top post was for my review of the Matte Black Vanishing Point. This one was closer and I have a photo post for it coming very soon. The Vanishing Point was my favorite pen for college notes. No fussing with the cap, a SOLID knock, and smooth writing performance. The clip may get in the way for some, but not all. The pen is wonderfully weighted and balanced. I haven’t been using my VPs as much, but while doing this post I re-inked one and it’s been in my carry. There’s always the question of “Pilot Vanishing Point or Lamy 2000?” and it’s a really tough one to answer.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor4. Kaweco Sport Fountain Pen

The ultimate pocket pen! Kaweco reached out to a bunch of bloggers in the year 2013 which has been awesome. There are tons of reviews out there of a lot of their product line, but their most popular pen is still the Sport. I got the aluminum version this year, and since getting it, I have yet to ink this one up. The format is great, but it’s even better when it’s entirely made of aluminum. I still like the Sport, especially in burgundy, but in my opinion the aluminum version just knocks it out of the park.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor3. Lamy Safari Fountain Pen

The Lamy Safari was my first fountain pen, and it will always have a special place in my collection. They’re solidly built, reasonably priced, and swappable nibs make them ultra versatile. I have four of them in my collection and 3 Al-Stars if that says anything. They’re great and I always have at least one inked up. Some may not like the triangular grip section, but it’s great at training your hand to write with a fountain pen. The modern industrial look is icing on the cake and I still recommend this pen as a first pen for beginners. It’s totally understandable why this review was the #3 post overall on the site.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor2. Sailor Professional Gear Imperial Black Fountain Pen

The stealthiest pen of all. When this was announced I knew I needed to have one. Don’t feel like spending $400? Do some homework and find a retailer in Japan. I got the pen for much less off of eBay straight from Japan than I would have had I purchased it from the States. Admittedly I don’t use this pen as much as it deserves to be used. Have I fallen out of love with it? I don’t think so. The ruthenium plated metal bits on the matte resin look simply amazing. Sailor’s nib designs are still my favorite out of any pen, and it looks even better in smoky black ruthenium. This is a pretty serious pen, and a very serious purchase. Overall, I still like how the pen looks, but I think the nib needs a smoothing. Totally understandable why people are looking for reviews of this pen.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor1. Lamy 2000 Fountain Pen

Not only is the Lamy 2000 my top post, it’s my all time favorite pen. The design has been around nearly 60 years and it’s still amazing. The contoured body, stainless grip, and brushed makrolon body are understated, yet stunning. The simplicity of the Lamy 2000 is what makes it so great. It’s in no way pretentious or gaudy. The pen fills by piston, with a nearly invisible knob. The hooded nib is gold and writes like butter. I could go on about this pen for ages, I love everything about it. If you’re looking to up your fountain pen game, I still highly suggest the Lamy 2000. This pen is ALWAYS inked and always with me. It’s the pen is the litmus test of the fountain pen word, and understandably so. Here’s to another 60 years of the Lamy 2000.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorWell, there you have it. The top 10 reviews of 2013. I want to thank everyone for reading, commenting, and supporting the site all year long. There’s been so much growth this year and so much positive feedback. It’s a great community that I’m proud to say I’m a part of. Do yourselves a favor and check out my blog roll for other great pen sites. As always, feel free to contact me with any questions you may have, I would be more than happy to help you pick out your next pen, help you get started with a pen blog, or any other pen-related needs.

Have a safe and happy new year!

Best,

Ed Jelley

Gallery:

 

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Photo Post

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen ReviewRotring 600 Fountain Pen – Lava Finish – Medium Nib (1994-2000)

Here’s another photo post…I’m starting to like these. This is becoming my go-to review format for discontinued or older pens. While the in-depth reviews can help with purchase decisions on products that readily available, I feel like these are kind of a cool way to feature a discontinued pen while still giving my impressions. Let’s be real, they’re basically the same as the full reviews, but without the fluff. This installment of my Photo Posts features the Rotring 600 Lava. This pen was produced between 1994 and 2000 and can be found pretty regularly on eBay. I’d like to thank Mr. Mike Dudek over at TheClickyPost.com for completely and totally enabling me to buy this pen. This wasn’t even your standard enabling through pictures or reviews on his site, it was a straight up email containing solely an eBay link. There seems to be an abundance of these in Slovakia, all coming from one eBay seller…possible weird Rotring mob stash? Possible. Anyway, enjoy the pictures of this awesome, awesome, awesome looking and feeling pen!

Rotring 600 Lava HandwrittenIntro:

  • Now discontinued
  • Mike Dudek is an enabler
  • SUPER German design
  • Hidden mob stash of them in Slovakia

Appearance and Packaging:

  • NOS in original plastic shell packaging!
  • Super plain nib, doesn’t even have a breather hole
  • Lava finish is awesome (looks and tactile feel)
  • Plastic clamshell packaging with plastic viewing window
  • Pen is thin, but not too thin

Nib and Filling System:

  • Good flow, relatively smooth steel nib could use some tweaking
  • Slightly scratchy UPDATE: better with other inks
  • Writes a true Western medium line
  • Fills with cartridge or converter – standard international size

Feel:

  • Nice heft, metal body
  • Unposted is more balanced than when posted
  • Finish is really cool.
  • Grip is a bit narrow, but still comfortable
  • All-metal body oozes quality

Pros:

  • Great build quality
  • Classic German design
  • Lava finish is unique

Cons:

  • Discontinued means the prices can get a little crazy
  • Back-heavy when posted

Conclusion:

  • I paid a good price for mine
  • I love German design – needed this in the collection
  • Nice to finally have a pen in Lava finish

Thanks for reading everyone!

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

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