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Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor

2013 – The Year In Review(s)

Hey everyone!

I wanted to do a year end wrap of of my post popular posts. Instead of just linking to them, I decided I’d have a little fun and do a quick reshoot of everyone together.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorThe photos were taken with my Olympus PEN E-P3, M. Zuiko 17mm f1.8 lens, and processed with Aperture 3 using the VSCO Film 02 Kodak Portra 400 VC film emulation. Something a little different than what I usually do on the site. I’ve also included an update blurb / mini review on each item.

So here we go, the Top 10 posts of 2013:

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorRunner up: Nock Co. Lookout Pen Case

This one was SO close to the Top 10, I had to include it. Nock Co. – created and successfully Kickstarted by Brad Dowdy (The Pen Addict) and his business partner and master seamster Jeffrey Bruckwicki has been protecting my pens for the past few months. They Kickstarter orders are in the process of being fulfilled and they look great. Watch out in 2014 for Nock Co.’s retail site / total pen case domination.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor10. Pilot Iroshizuku Fuyu-Syogun

Still one of my favorite inks. Since getting it back in the beginning of the year, it’s seen some heavy rotation. I haven’t had it loaded up as much recently as I used to, but it’s a great ink. Awesome performance and a really nice bluish grey makes Fuyu-Syogun versatile and interesting to write with. If you’re looking for a grey ink, then I highly recommend this one.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor9. Tomoe River Writing Pad from Nanami Paper

This one’s picked up a few stickers since my first review of it. Tomoe River paper took 2013 by storm and for good reason. It’s the thinnest paper I have written on and some of the smoothest and best behaved. I like throwing a sheet of Doane paper behind the sheet I’m writing on for extra organization. The thin paper is very sheer, but ink doesn’t even think about bleeding or feathering. It’s an awesome paper product that every fountain pen enthusiast needs to check out. I now need to have Tomoe Paper on hand, it’s just that good.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor8. Sailor Sapporo Fountain Pen

The Sailor Sapporo is a great little pen. My specimen has an extra fine nib and writes about as smooth as a nib so fine can. It’s nice and small when capped, but comfortable when posted. I got mine for a steal ($50) off the Fountain Pen Network classifieds. Is it worth the full asking price? Maybe not, but keep an eye out for a used model and you won’t be let down. Usage has dwindled since getting it, but it’s my finest writing pen. I like having a nib that small available when I need it.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor7. Pilot Metropolitan Fountain Pen

Another pen that gained great popularity in 2013 is the Pilot Metropolitan. I still can’t believe that this pen is only $15. It’s buttery smooth, comes with a converter, and is solidly constructed out of metal. It’s a great pen for beginners as well as serious collectors. The nib is also able to swap with the budget-priced Pilot Penmanship and Plumix – adding more options to the pen at a low price. I love my Metropolitan. This pen has undoubtedly given the Lamy Safari a run for it’s money as the best beginner pen. It still holds up from the original review, and no other pen has been able to match the value.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor6. Pilot Iroshizuku Kon-Peki

Here’s my favorite blue ink. It’s bright, performs well, and is a pleasure to look at. The bottle is beautiful as well. One sample, and it’s hard to not buy the bottle. I really like this ink in my Montblanc 149’s medium nib – it washes out easily too. It’s a great ink all around, and my favorite of the Iroshizuku line. I still use Kon-Peki all the time, and it’s usually in at least one pen.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor5. Pilot Vanishing Point Fountain Pen

Technically the top post was for my review of the Matte Black Vanishing Point. This one was closer and I have a photo post for it coming very soon. The Vanishing Point was my favorite pen for college notes. No fussing with the cap, a SOLID knock, and smooth writing performance. The clip may get in the way for some, but not all. The pen is wonderfully weighted and balanced. I haven’t been using my VPs as much, but while doing this post I re-inked one and it’s been in my carry. There’s always the question of “Pilot Vanishing Point or Lamy 2000?” and it’s a really tough one to answer.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor4. Kaweco Sport Fountain Pen

The ultimate pocket pen! Kaweco reached out to a bunch of bloggers in the year 2013 which has been awesome. There are tons of reviews out there of a lot of their product line, but their most popular pen is still the Sport. I got the aluminum version this year, and since getting it, I have yet to ink this one up. The format is great, but it’s even better when it’s entirely made of aluminum. I still like the Sport, especially in burgundy, but in my opinion the aluminum version just knocks it out of the park.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor3. Lamy Safari Fountain Pen

The Lamy Safari was my first fountain pen, and it will always have a special place in my collection. They’re solidly built, reasonably priced, and swappable nibs make them ultra versatile. I have four of them in my collection and 3 Al-Stars if that says anything. They’re great and I always have at least one inked up. Some may not like the triangular grip section, but it’s great at training your hand to write with a fountain pen. The modern industrial look is icing on the cake and I still recommend this pen as a first pen for beginners. It’s totally understandable why this review was the #3 post overall on the site.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor2. Sailor Professional Gear Imperial Black Fountain Pen

The stealthiest pen of all. When this was announced I knew I needed to have one. Don’t feel like spending $400? Do some homework and find a retailer in Japan. I got the pen for much less off of eBay straight from Japan than I would have had I purchased it from the States. Admittedly I don’t use this pen as much as it deserves to be used. Have I fallen out of love with it? I don’t think so. The ruthenium plated metal bits on the matte resin look simply amazing. Sailor’s nib designs are still my favorite out of any pen, and it looks even better in smoky black ruthenium. This is a pretty serious pen, and a very serious purchase. Overall, I still like how the pen looks, but I think the nib needs a smoothing. Totally understandable why people are looking for reviews of this pen.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy Sailor1. Lamy 2000 Fountain Pen

Not only is the Lamy 2000 my top post, it’s my all time favorite pen. The design has been around nearly 60 years and it’s still amazing. The contoured body, stainless grip, and brushed makrolon body are understated, yet stunning. The simplicity of the Lamy 2000 is what makes it so great. It’s in no way pretentious or gaudy. The pen fills by piston, with a nearly invisible knob. The hooded nib is gold and writes like butter. I could go on about this pen for ages, I love everything about it. If you’re looking to up your fountain pen game, I still highly suggest the Lamy 2000. This pen is ALWAYS inked and always with me. It’s the pen is the litmus test of the fountain pen word, and understandably so. Here’s to another 60 years of the Lamy 2000.

Click here to check out the original review.

Top Posts 2013 Fountain Pen Ink Reviews Lamy SailorWell, there you have it. The top 10 reviews of 2013. I want to thank everyone for reading, commenting, and supporting the site all year long. There’s been so much growth this year and so much positive feedback. It’s a great community that I’m proud to say I’m a part of. Do yourselves a favor and check out my blog roll for other great pen sites. As always, feel free to contact me with any questions you may have, I would be more than happy to help you pick out your next pen, help you get started with a pen blog, or any other pen-related needs.

Have a safe and happy new year!

Best,

Ed Jelley

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Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Photo Post

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen ReviewRotring 600 Fountain Pen – Lava Finish – Medium Nib (1994-2000)

Here’s another photo post…I’m starting to like these. This is becoming my go-to review format for discontinued or older pens. While the in-depth reviews can help with purchase decisions on products that readily available, I feel like these are kind of a cool way to feature a discontinued pen while still giving my impressions. Let’s be real, they’re basically the same as the full reviews, but without the fluff. This installment of my Photo Posts features the Rotring 600 Lava. This pen was produced between 1994 and 2000 and can be found pretty regularly on eBay. I’d like to thank Mr. Mike Dudek over at TheClickyPost.com for completely and totally enabling me to buy this pen. This wasn’t even your standard enabling through pictures or reviews on his site, it was a straight up email containing solely an eBay link. There seems to be an abundance of these in Slovakia, all coming from one eBay seller…possible weird Rotring mob stash? Possible. Anyway, enjoy the pictures of this awesome, awesome, awesome looking and feeling pen!

Rotring 600 Lava HandwrittenIntro:

  • Now discontinued
  • Mike Dudek is an enabler
  • SUPER German design
  • Hidden mob stash of them in Slovakia

Appearance and Packaging:

  • NOS in original plastic shell packaging!
  • Super plain nib, doesn’t even have a breather hole
  • Lava finish is awesome (looks and tactile feel)
  • Plastic clamshell packaging with plastic viewing window
  • Pen is thin, but not too thin

Nib and Filling System:

  • Good flow, relatively smooth steel nib could use some tweaking
  • Slightly scratchy UPDATE: better with other inks
  • Writes a true Western medium line
  • Fills with cartridge or converter – standard international size

Feel:

  • Nice heft, metal body
  • Unposted is more balanced than when posted
  • Finish is really cool.
  • Grip is a bit narrow, but still comfortable
  • All-metal body oozes quality

Pros:

  • Great build quality
  • Classic German design
  • Lava finish is unique

Cons:

  • Discontinued means the prices can get a little crazy
  • Back-heavy when posted

Conclusion:

  • I paid a good price for mine
  • I love German design – needed this in the collection
  • Nice to finally have a pen in Lava finish

Thanks for reading everyone!

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

Rotring 600 Lava Fountain Pen Review

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Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPens

Sailor Clear Candy Fountain Pen Review

Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPensThe Sailor Clear Candy Fountain Pen

in Gold

- Handwritten Review -

Specs:

  • Description: Sailor’s entry offer to fountain pens that comes in a variety of colors
  • Nib: M-F Japanese Steel Nib
  • Filling Mechanism: Cartridge / Converter – includes one cartridge
  • Weight: ~11 grams
  • Measurements: 5.25″ closed, 6″ posted
  • Ink Capactiy: Sailor Proprietary Cartridge, ~.75ml
  • Color Options: Check out all 17 of them here!

Handwritten Review Scans:

 

Intro/About:
JetPens was kind enough to offer up a pen for me to review. A few days later, the Sailor Clear Candy arrived at my door. The Clear Candy is an entry-level pen from Sailor, but has some nice touches that are usually found on much more expensive pens. Looking at reviews of the pen on JetPens, there were some who loved it, and some who hated it. The most common complaint was a lack of flow, but the pen that I received writes great and I have no complaints. Onto the review!

JetPens Banner
I would just like to thank JetPens for sending over the pen to review, check them out for tons of awesome Japanese pens and stationery. Free shipping on orders over $25, and hitting that is pretty easy with all the great stuff they have. So thanks again!

Appearance & Packaging:Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPens

Well, packaging really isn’t that important to me and in the case of the Sailor Clear Candy, it’s just a crinkly plastic bag. For the price of the pen ($16.50) I didn’t expect any elaborate packaging and I’d rather those costs go into the build quality of the pen rather than a box. The pen doesn’t have too many bells and whistles, but the pen is a good size. The cap has a gold star on the top, and the plastic clip matches the star. Everything on the pen is either white, clear or gold plastic. The only metal here is the nib, but for a cheap pen at a low price, this isn’t too far out of what is expected.

Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPensThe pen is definitely marketed towards Japanese teenagers, being that most of the colors are bright and metallic. I’m not one to judge anyone really, but the color offerings aren’t quite as masculine as the rest of the pens in my collection. There’s minimal branding on the pen – a small “Sailor” stamp on the nib, a small screened logo on the cap, and a permanent decal (which I thought was a removable sticker) with some Sailor branding and a barcode above the smaller logo on the cap. This is certainly a departure in the looks department from a pen I would normally use, but it’s fun.

Nib Performance & Filling System:

Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPens

The filling system is nothing fancy. It takes the proprietary Sailor cartridges or Sailor converters. I’ve said it before, I really don’t mind the cartridge/converter system. I don’t really need a pen to carry 3ml of ink, I have way too short of an attention span to go through all of that without wanting to change things up.

Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPensThe best part about the Sailor Clear Candy is the nib. The entire line of pens come with the same M-F nib. The nib is smooth…very smooth. It’s actually really great. I love the line width and smoothness. It’s definitely one of the better steel nibs I’ve used. I was surprised at how well the pen wrote, given it’s price. The feed is able to keep up with fast writing, and the wetness of the line is right in the middle where I like it. This pen is an absolute pleasure to write with. I’m contemplating doing some pen surgery and seeing what else I can fit this nib on to.

Feel:Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPens

The part about the pen that I think most people will have an issue with is the materials that the pen is made out of. The plastic is definitely cheap, and there’s no hiding that. The clear plastic isn’t crystal clear and polished up like a more expensive demonstrator. It feels like the Platinum Preppy (but hopefully less brittle) – like it could crack very easily if placed under pressure (don’t put it in your back pocket and sit down…).

Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPensThe plastic may be cheap, but that doesn’t mean the pen can’t be comfortable in the hand and write well. The light body and the pen’s full-size help cut down on hand fatigue. I really like the wider grip section (as compared to a Lamy Safari or a Pilot Metropolitan). The pen is comfortable to hold and well balanced both posted, and uncapped. The pen is a bit long at around 6″ when posted, but I still prefer to write with it this way. Other than the plastic, I really like how the pen feels in hand.

Pros:

  • Surprisingly great nib performance
  • Dimensions – the wider grip is nice
  • Good flow and line consistency
  • Threaded cap screws on

Cons:

  • Plastic body is cheap – may crack
  • Most color offerings are less-than-masculine
  • Slightly expensive for what it is.

Conclusion:Sailor Clear Candy Gold Fountain Pen Review JetPens

The Sailor Clear Candy has one of the best/cheapest steel nibs I have ever used. It’s better than all of the Lamy nibs I’ve used, and I prefer the line width to that of the Pilot Metropolitan. The body of the pen is made of cheap plastic, but it’s size and weight make for little to no hand fatigue. A replacement Lamy nib is around $11.00 and for a few more dollars you can get this entire pen, with the great nib included. I have to mention that the Pilot Metropolitan is a higher quality pen, but it’s not for everyone. Pilot may dominate the sub-$20 fountain pen market, but the Sailor Clear Candy can definitely compete. Even if you don’t like the way the pen looks, I can almost guarantee that you’ll be blown away with how it write.

Thanks again to JetPens for sending this over to review, check out all 17 of their color offerings for the Sailor Clear Candy!

Gallery:

Disclaimer: This pen was provided to me as a review unit, free of charge, by JetPens. I was not compensated for this review, and this did not have any effect on my thoughts and opinions about the pen. Thank you for reading!

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1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review

Sailor Magellan Photo Post

1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review

Sailor Magellan Demonstrator – Medium Nib (1998)

Wow. That’s all I have to say about this pen. I purchased this pen on a whim from GoPens.com’s Quarterly Catalog. Continuing the streak of buying Sailor Pens for $55, I picked up this NOS 1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator, with a medium, 14k gold nib. The clip has some weird corrosion on it, but it’s easily looked over. I can not begin to tell you how smoothly this pen writes. It’s amazing, and I practically zone out every time I’m using it out of pure writing enjoyment. Why am I not doing a full review on this pen? The answer is because it’s no longer available and I have had some trouble getting any more information on it. However, in the picture below, you’ll see a bullet style review written out using the categories I use in my full pen reviews. Please enjoy the photos, and if you happen to see one of these out in the wild for sale, jump on it!

1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen ReviewIntro:

  • Impulse buy – at $50, how could I say no?
  • Hard to find – going on 15 years old
  • Hands down, the smoothest writing pen I own

Appearance and Packaging:

  • Demo with gold accents – I like, don’t love, it
  • Nib is very plain, lightly stamped anchor and some filigree
  • Gold band at grip looks good – like the Pelikan M605’s silver band
  • Original pen comes with a box – this one didn’t
  • Regular full-sized pen – in between the Sapporo and the Professional Gear

Nib and Filling System:

  • Super wet, super smooth – smoothest pen I own
  • About the same nib width as a Lamy 2000 medium
  • Big step in width from a modern Professional Gear fine nib
  • Fills with cartridge or converter – nothing special

Feel:

  • Medium weight – feels good for extended writing sessions
  • Size is good – comfortable both posted and non-posted
  • Grip is comfortable – between Professional Gear and Sapporo
  • Feels like the Pelikan M605 – but 1/6 of the price…

Pros:

  • Smoothest. Pen. Ever.
  • OMG at the price I paid ($55 shipped…)
  • Weight and balance are idea

Cons:

  • Cleaning demonstrators (to OCD clean) is not fun…
  • Flies through ink (which isn’t bad for me)

Conclusion:

  • Everything happens for a reason – I sold my Pelikan M605, and this pen came into my life shortly after, filling any and all void left behind
  • Amazing nib / writing experience
  • Looks great
  • Price was amazing – not biased – I would have gladly paid full retail for this pen. It’s a better writer than my M605 was.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
I have only used Iroshizuku fuyu-syogun in the pen so far, I’m sure a bright blue would look great sloshing around in there.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
Here it is on the back cover of a Rhodia pad – needs some contrast to show off the innards.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
You can see the wonderful, great, super awesome, best-nib-ever through the cap. The inner plastic has become a little cloudy and is a pain in the neck to get out to clean. Oh well.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
The text on the cap band looks a little outdated, but that’s perfectly fine because it’s a pen from the 90’s. You can see the corrosion on the cap – maybe this Sailor wasn’t stored so carefully?
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
Alternate view – the other side at the same angle. It’s nice to be able to see the nib. I really wish I loaded it up with a brighter ink for these pictures!
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
The nib is really rather plain, but that’s okay. I prefer the more elaborate Sailor nibs.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
It’s crazy how much this pen feels like my ex-Pelikan M605. The weight and balance are quite similar. The gold band at the end of the grip reminds me of the silver one on the Pelikan.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
Dark and brooding nib picture. This thing mercilessly pours out ink. I swear you can see the converter emptying as you write.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
All posted up. Very classy looking pen.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
Compared to a posted Kaweco AL-Star. The pen is a decent amount bigger when posted, that extra centimeter or so really makes a difference.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
That nib in action.
1998 Sailor Magellan Demonstrator Fountain Pen Review
The super wet nib allows for some great shading.

Thanks for reading everyone!

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Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 9

Sailor Sapporo Fountain Pen Review

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 7The Sailor Sapporo
Fountain Pen

- Handwritten Review -

Specs:

  • Description: One of the smaller offerings from Sailor, but posted this pen is quite comfortable. Classic looks and styling paired with an awesome nib make this pen one of my new daily carries.
  • Nib: 14k rhodium-plated gold
  • Body: Black resin
  • Trim: Rhodium
  • Filling Mechanism: Cartridge/Converter
  • Weight: 19.5grams
  • Measurements: 4.9″ closed, 3.5″ open, 5.6″ posted
  • Ink Capactiy: ~1ml

Handwritten Review Scans:

Intro/About:

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 5
I picked up this pen from the Fountain Pen Network Classifieds for a great price. It’s my second Sailor, this time in an extra fine nib. At first, I thought the EF was going to be too fine for my liking, but I’m enjoying it a lot more than I thought I would. It’s been my go-to pocket pen since it’s arrived. Since I purchased it for only $55, I don’t mind if it gets bumped around a bit. The pen was already “pre-loved” when I received it, so apologies for the scratches in the pictures. I tried by best to polish them out, but maybe this is a good thing. If you throw your shiny resin Sailor into your pocket or bag, watch out because it will get scratched up. Anyway, onto the review. This pen is really, really great.

Appearance & Packaging:

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 13
Packaging is going to be left out of this review. Why? Because my packaging for this pen was a plastic bag, some bubble wrap, newspaper, and a Canada post shipping box. A quick Google shows that the pen comes in the standard Sailor pen box with a few cartridges and a converter. The box is high quality than a throwaway, but it’s nothing unique or exciting.

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 12

The Sapporo is definitely on the smaller side of the spectrum when dealing in modern fountain pens. If you wish to include vintage, then this pen lies right about in the middle. It’s pretty close in size to the TWSBI mini – when capped or posted. The Sailor Sapporo is right at home in a pocket where it takes up minimal room. When unposted, the pen is a bit too small to comfortably write with for me, but when posted it’s perfect. The pen is on the lighter side and it’s very well balanced. Only the lightest touch is required to lay ink down on the page, even from this extra fine Japanese nib. My Sapporo is the black resin model with rhodium (silver) trim. It’s a classic looking fountain pen with all of the details that are to be expected on a larger and more expensive pen. There’s a double cap band with engraving, a stamped gold nib with beautiful detail work, metal internal threads inside the body, and much more. It’s a great looking and performing pen in a highly portable package. 

Nib Performance & Filling System:

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 8
For a pen that lays down such an incredibly fine line, it’s very smooth. There is a bit of feedback from the nib, but this is to be expected from something that writes a 0.2mm-0.3mm line. The nib puts ink on the page with no hesitation and minimal pressure. You can now count be in as part of the super fine Japanese nib fanclub (most likely headed by Mr. Brad Dowdy at PenAddict.com). I really really like how the nib looks too. The stamp / engraving on the nib is some of my favorite out there. I love the anchor and the scroll work. From the second I saw a Sailor nib, I knew I needed one in my collection (now I have two…). If you’re looking for an extra fine nib that writes well, look no further. Also worth pointing out is that this pen/ink combo is my standard for writing in Field Notes. While they’re not always fountain pen friendly, the extra fine nib and the pigmented ink don’t bleed through the page and dry quickly without feathering. The ink also tends to last forever due to the thin line requiring minimal ink to write.

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 9
The filling system in the Sailor Sapporo is a standard cartridge/converter system. There’s nothing new or exciting about the system, but it works. It doesn’t really bother me how the pen fills, and I don’t mind that there’s no piston. I tend to change inks frequently, so the smaller capacity in the converter is actually welcome in most situations. The EF nib has great “gas mileage” and a full converter lasted around two weeks. Many modern Japanese fountain pens use the cartridge/converter system, but Sailor does offer a Realo model of the 1911 that is a piston fill. It definitely tacks on a decent chunk of money to the price, and I feel that the ink window detracts from the way the pen looks.

Feel:

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 15
I touched on this a bit before, the Sailor Sapporo is a pretty small pen. It’s on the lighter side but it is very well balanced. While I don’t have one to compare it to, it’s almost identical in specs to the TWSBI mini. It’s a few millimeters longer than a Pilot Vanishing Point (with nib extended) and pretty close in size to a Parker Sonnet Cisele (both pens posted). I decided to show the pen next to a Lamy 2000. It’s a fair bit smaller when capped, but when posted they’re quite comparable. The larger exposed nib on the Sailor makes the pen feel larger than it is.

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 17
The grip on the Sapporo is comfortable with a slight flare before the nib. The diameter is comfortable in my medium sized hands (check the Kaweco Sport review for reference) and extended writing is no problem. I got through the handwritten review in one sitting with no problems. The pen is well suited for a pocket carry, but it comfortable enough to be a full time pen. Writing without posting the pen is a bit uncomfortable for me, so take note if you do not like to write with the cap posted. If you plan on using just the pen and putting the cap aside, you’ve been warned, it’s just a hair over 3.5″.

Pros:

  • Surprisingly smooth EF nib
  • Good weight and balance for extended writing
  • I always enjoy writing with it
  • Pocket friendly

Cons:

  • May be too small for larger hands – check out the 1911 and Professional Gear series
  • Price is a bit high for what it is

Conclusion:

Sailor Sapporo Extra Fine Fountain Pen 10
I’m really, really enjoying this pen. BUT, I don’t know if I’m biased because I only paid $55 USD for it. This may be part of the reason why I like it so much. At around $155 new, this is no impulse purchase. There are many other pens in the price range, including the Lamy 2000, the Pilot Vanishing Point, and many more. It’s definitely getting into the higher end pen price range. It’s really hard for me to recommend this pen over the Lamy 2000, but some people will prefer it. It’s a solid performer that I’ve been carrying every day (about a month straight at the time of writing) since I’ve received the pen. Here’s my advice: If you can find one second hand at a reasonable price, 100% pick it up, you won’t be disappointed. Make sure to check the Japanese direct retailers (engeika.com, kendo_karate on eBay, ratuken.com) because they usually have better prices on these pens straight from their country of origin. There are tons of options in the $150 price range, and this may not be my first choice, but it certainly isn’t a bad one by any means.

Recommendation: Second hand – absolutely. Brand new at $155 – do your shopping carefully!

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