Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

Omas Arte Italiana Vintage Arco Celluloid Paragon Fountain Pen Review

Omas Arte Italiana Vintage
Arco Celluloid Paragon
Fountain Pen

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

- Handwritten Review -

  • Review Ink: Pilot Iroshizuku Tsuki-Yo
  • Review Paper: Rhodia No. 18

Specs:

  • Description:  Quite possibly one of the nicest looking fountain pens I have ever seen, the Omas Paragon in Vintage Arco Celluloid is a perfectly balanced, great writing pen.
  • Nib: 18k gold, Soft-Fine Nib
  • Material: Arco Celluloid
  • Filling Mechanism: Piston filler
  • Ink Capactiy: ~1ml
  • Price: $800

Handwritten Review Scans:

Intro/About:

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

Wow. That’s the first word that comes to mind when I see this pen. The Omas Arte Italiana Milord in Arco Celluloid is one of the most stunning pens I have ever seen. Huge thanks to my friends over at Kenro Industries (the US distributor of Omas, Aurora, Sheaffer and Montegrappa) for letting me borrow these beautiful pens for review. I hope you enjoy the review as much as I did spending time with these pens! This review is based on the gold finished model with a fine nib. This is also the first review shot with my new Canon 7D, make sure to click the images and supersize them for the full effect!

Appearance & Packaging:

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

Where to start… This pen is absolutely beautiful. Great vintage styling and an amazing, deep celluloid that looks almost as if it is on fire when in the right lighting. The pen has 12 flat sides that not only give it a great look, but prevent it from rolling off the table or desk. The gold accented model perfectly compliments the colors of the celluloid. Out of the three trims (gold, rose gold, and rhodium) the gold is my favorite. There are 3 thin cap bands that go well with the overall vintage design of the pen. The gold nib has a classic arrow style pattern, reminiscent of the old Parker nibs. It’s a great looking pen that just works on so many levels. Omas did a great job on this one…seriously.

Nib Performance & Filling System:

Omas Arco Celluloid Milord 3

The nib on the Omas has a great nib. It’s actually more than great, it’s probably one of the best pens I have ever written with. The 18k nib has a bit of cushion with normal writing and it’s capable of some nice line variation if you push it just a little bit. The nib is buttery smooth and always starts up, even if left uncapped on my desk for a few minutes.

Omas Arco Celluloid Milord 2

This is the first Omas I’ve tried so I wasn’t really sure what to expect. While doing some research I found that most Omas pens do indeed write very wet out of the box. See the handwritten review pictures for an example of the line variation possible when pushing the nib. It’s a top-tier pen that has a price tag to match, but it definitely looks, writes and feels like one.

Feel:

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

The Omas is not too big and not too small, for me it’s just right. The pen is rather lightweight at 20g, weighing in just under a Lamy 2000. Posting the cap lengthens the pen quite a bit, but it still maintains its excellent balance. I prefer writing with this pen unposted though. There are several steps in the barrel, all of which are very small and transition nicely into each other. There are no sharp edges and the threads are practically unnoticeable – making for a very comfortable writing experience.

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

The light weight of the pen and the nibs ability to glide across the paper make for an excellent overall writing experience. The Arco celluloid is smooth to the touch and warms up in your hand as you write. The pen is the perfect size and weight for me and it practically disappears into my hand. Longer writing sessions are a breeze.

Pros:

  • Celluloid is so nice to look at
  • Soft 18k gold nib writes great
  • Perfect weight and balance
  • Nib is a wet writer straight out of the box

Cons:

  • Piston mechanism knob is celluloid on celluloid, and can be a little hard to turn

Conclusion:

Omas Milord Arco Celluloid Fountain Pen Review

The Omas Special Edition Arte Italiana Arco Celluloid Paragon is quite expensive, but I can totally understand why. It is a piece of functional art that shows off the history of the brand. It also doesn’t hurt that the nib is amazing, and it is one of the best pens I have ever written with. The Arco celluloid practically glows in your hand as the light catches it. It’s a beautiful looking pen that is not overdone in any way. Huge thanks to my friends at Kenro Industries for loaning me these pens to review, I’m going to have a hard time giving this one back!

Gallery:

Disclaimer: This pen was provided to me as a loaner for review purposes by Kenro Industries. All opinions are my own.

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Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case Review

Nock Co. – “The Brasstown” Pen Case Review

 

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewNock Co.
“Brasstown” Pen Case
Handmade in the USA

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewIf you’re not familiar with Nock Co. already, then now is the time to go check them out. After a wildly successful Kickstarter campaign, the Nock Co. backer reward packages are now fulfilled. They are opening up their online store to the general public shortly, giving themselves a little time to build up some inventory. The first (of many) cases I’m reviewing is the Brasstown. I was looking forward to this case the most due to its versatility and unique design.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewNock Co. is the brainchild of Mr. Brad Dowdy (aka The Pen Addict) and seamster Jeffrey Bruckwicki (http://bruckwicki.com/) – their primary goal being to supply the pen community with stylish, well-made, and thoughtfully designed products.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewThe Brasstown is essentially a pen roll that rolls up nicely and zips away safely into a pouch. The pen slots are on an attached “tounge” that rolls in and out of the case. Materials are top-notch and construction is a noticeable step up from the prototype model I reviewed a few months back.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewThere’s a bit of extra fabric built into the roll so that none of the pen clips touch each other. I’ve been keeping some pricier pieces in there, and I can say that I’m not worried about their safety when tucked away in the Brasstown. I opted for the grey and blue color scheme, which is subtle when closed up, but has a great pop of color when unrolled. The contrasting blue stitching on the outside is a great touch that acts as a preview for what’s inside.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewThe pouch is a bit larger than I had expected, but this is a welcomed discovery. When fully loaded with 6 larger pens, the case is still capable of being stuffed with a few more. I keep my One Star Leather pen sleeve tucked inside the roll as well. The extra room can easily accommodate cheaper or more durable pens that you don’t mind touching each other.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewI’m extremely happy with my Brasstown. The only thing worth mentioning is that I have to pay attention to which side is up. I store the case vertically in my bag, and the double zipper can be oriented either way, so there’s no clear-cut way to tell which side is up. I may throw a small zipper pull on there as an indicator. Overall, the case is constructed solidly, it looks absolutely great, and most importantly, it does an excellent job of keeping my prized fountain pens safe, sound, and accessible.

Nock Co. Brasstown Final Production Run Pen Case ReviewNock Co. on Instagram
Nock Co.’s website
Notebook: Seven Seas Tomoe River Journal

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

Wality Piston Filler Fountain Pen Review

The Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen
in Burgundy
- Handwritten Review -

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

 

Specs:

  • Description: A Made in India piston filler fountain pen
  • Nib: Medium Steel Nib
  • Filling Mechanism: Piston
  • Ink Capactiy: ~1.5ml
  • Price: $10

Handwritten Review Scans:

 

Intro/About:

Thank you to my friend Sanay for sending over these Indian fountain pens for review! This particular pen is a piston filler with a steel medium nib. THe pen was made in India, and hand smoothed by Sanay. The Wality has classic 1940s-era fountain pen styling, and is a decent writer, especially given the price.

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

 

Appearance & Packaging:

The Wality is a nice looking pen. It’s got a decent size and feels great in hand. I particularly like the shape of the nib, it’s similar to the softer shouldered Pelikan nibs. There are clear ink windows in the body of the pen. The color scheme is nice, as burgundy is one of my favorite colors. The silver accents compliment the pen nicely as well. The finish on the pen is a bit rough, but for $9.00, it’s acceptable. The pen is made of what I believe is vegetal resin, and it’s a bit soft. This pen will get marred pretty easily if carelessly thrown in a bag, or put in your pocket with keys or some change. It’s not a bad looking pen, but the $9.00 price tag more than makes up for its shortcomings here.

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

Nib Performance & Filling System:

Sanay smoothed the nib by hand, and it’s a nice writer. The ink flow is good and the steel nib writes nice and smooth. The pen is a piston filler, similar to the Noodler’s Konrad. The piston is nicely greased and does its job without fuss. The ink reservoir is large, and the piston action makes it easy to drink up a whole bunch of ink. The steel nib is not the best I’ve ever written with, but it’s certainly not the worst. The Wality falls somewhere in the middle of the spectrum, and it’s probably in the upper tier of its price range.

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

Feel:

Size-wise, the Wality is a good fit for my hand. The grip is comfortable and a nice diameter. The finish of the pen is okay at best, and could benefit from a few minutes under a buffing wheel. The weight and balance of the pen are both good, even when posted – this is due in part to the light weight of the cap. The piston knob turns nicely, but be careful when posting the cap. The cap posts on the piston knob and if you are not careful while removing it, there can easily be an ink spill (see the handwritten review…). Also worth noting is the unique and distinctive smell of the vegetal resin. If you’ve ever had a Noodler’s pen, you’ll know EXACTLY what I’m talking about. I’m happy to report that it does fade over time and wasn’t nearly as intense as Noodler’s offering.

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

Pros:

  • Price
  • Value
  • Smooth writer

Cons:

  • Finish could be better
  • Cap posts onto piston knob

Conclusion:

The standout detail on this pen is the shape of the nib. Overall, for $9.00, it’s certainly not a bad deal. The nib performs well, and the piston filler system works great. Thank you to Sanay for sending the pen over for review! Be on the lookout for his website in the near future to get some hand-smoothed Indian pens for yourself!

Order via Email.

Wality Piston Fill Fountain Pen Review

 

Gallery:

Disclaimer: This pen was provided to me as a review unit, free of charge, by Sanay Shah. I was not compensated for this review, and this did not have any effect on my thoughts and opinions about the pen. Thank you for reading!

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

Pilot Vanishing Point Fountain Pen Followup Review / Photo Post

Pilot Vanishing Point in Metallic Orange
Fountain Pen

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

- Followup Review -

For the original review, see here!

Notes:

I’m going to be doing a new series of follow up reviews here on the site that you will continue to see more and more of down the line. I think it’s really important to follow up on reviews, especially the popular ones. Often there’s a “Honeymoon Phase” where there’s excitement for a new pen, and it soon wears off. Please let me know in the comments if there is anything else you would like to know about how the pen is holding up, how much usage it gets, or anything else you may want to know! I have had two Vanishing Points before, and they’re a great versatile pen.

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

To promote the new range of metallic colors, Deborah over at Pilot graciously sent over a new Vanishing Point in Desert Orange. Thank you Deborah! Instead of simply reviewing the pen again and showing some pictures of the color, I’ve decided to also let you know how my old Vanishing Point is holding up, if any initial praise has worn off, and how much real use mine has gotten. Once again, huge thanks to my friends over at Pilot, and enjoy the update!

How It’s Holding Up:

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

The VP is definitely a durable pen that is meant to be carried and used. I’ve owned the matte black version since June of 2012. The nib (ordered “Binderized” from Richard’s Pens) is still great and buttery smooth. I haven’t used the original fine nib that I purchased the pen with because I wasn’t thrilled with its performance. It was dry and scratchy and just not that pleasant to write with. I’m happy to report that the medium nib that Pilot sent with the orange VP is great. No scratchiness, great flow, and it starts up every time. The finish on the matte black version of the pen has started to show some wear.

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

There were complaints about the pens finish chipping away, exposing the brass underneath. Mine’s not thrashed, but I quite like the character that the pen has developed from being carried over time. The new Metallic VP has a clear coat that appears to be much more durable than the matte finish. I had a gun metal grey version of the pen (that I sold to fund my Nakaya) that I had carried for a bit with no issues at all. Overall, the VP is holding up very well, especially when considering the amount of usage it has gotten and the numerous amount of times I’ve carried it in-pocket, sans-case.

Honeymoon Phase?:

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

Getting a new pen is always fun. It’s hard to not love a new pen, and you may be more inclined to use it, take pictures of it, show it off, and love it to pieces – all because it’s new. I’m happy to report that my love for the Pilot Vanishing Point has not worn off. After my initial purchase two years ago, I had bought another one a year later at the LI Pen Show. I recently sold the gun metal version to fund my Nakaya, but it wasn’t easy to part with it. I’m glad that there are two Vanishing Points back in my collection with the addition of the Orange Metallic. I absolutely love the design and utility of the pen, coupled with the excellent performance of the black-plated 18k gold nib. Also, a retractable clicky fountain pen? Can’t really get much cooler or convenient than that…

Usage:

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

Have you ever gotten a nice new pen, inked it up, used it for a week straight, the shelved it for the foreseeable future? I have.  Several times. Once again, this isn’t the case with the Vanishing Point. The VP is a great pen for both quick notes and longer writing sessions. The pen was absolutely perfect for college lecture notes. Not having to worry about keeping track of a pen cap is more convenient than you may think. Especially so when moving between classes – there’s nothing to leave behind or drop on the floor. There’s a very good chance that I have a VP inked at all times, and when I don’t, I wish that I did. The pen definitely gets enough usage to justify the ~$140 price tag!

Conclusion:

Pilot Vanishing Point Metallic Orange Fountain Pen Review

The Vanishing Point is a solid addition to any pen collection that I will continue to use and love. I have no doubts that my 2.5 year old VP will continue to serve me well for many more years to come. I’m also happy to report that the new stock medium nib is a much better performer than my old fine nib too. I’ve had 3 VPs in my collection, but only two remain. Like I said before, the only reason I parted with one was to fund a larger pen purchase, and it wasn’t easy parting ways. I would love to hear your feedback on these new follow up reviews as well! Thanks again to Deborah over at Pilot Pens for sending me over this awesome new VP!

Recommendation: Yes! The Vanishing Point has held up to years of heavy use, and continues to be one of my most reached for pens.

 

Disclaimer: I received this pen free of charge from Pilot for review purposes. However, it does not have any effect on my feelings and thoughts about the pen.

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Weekly Loadout Submission – Jeffrey Bruckwicki of Nock Co.

If you would like to submit your Weekly Loadout of pens, ink, and paper, please share by clicking here!

Jeffrey Bruckwicki of Nock Co.’s Loadout

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Jeffrey’s Description:

From left to right:

  • Nock Co. Note Card Prototype Sleeve
  • Nock Co. Dot.-Dash Note Cards
  • Esterbrook LJ with EF Flex Nib 9128, inked with Rohrer & Klingner Schreibtine
  • Nock Co. Reject Lookout
  • Platinum Pro-Use .7 with H4 Lead
  • Karas Kustom Render K in Delrin with Gold Anodized Tip with Hi-tec C 0.28 refill (gift from Dudek
  • Mini Maglite LED 

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I don’t keep many pens inked up because I let a few dry out. So I keep to my Esterbrook from Brad which is the prefect writing experience for me. When I am making lists of ticking things off an existing list I go Render K. When a new product idea hits I sketch it with the Pro-Use. I really dig that my EDC flashlight fits so well in our Lookout so that goes everywhere with me now. The two under-wrap items are the prototype note card sleeve and the note cards themselves. This is my go to recording device. Every few weeks I go through the used cards and scan them in with my Doxie Flip for permanent records.

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Favorite Combo:

Render K with a black Hi-tec C and our note cards. It’s just so damn smooth and it forces me to write more clearly. 

Least Favorite Combo:

I don’t sketch a huge amount so the Pro-Use doesn’t get much love. I have tried other pencils like the Kuru-toga but always come back to this. 

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Editor’s Note:

He is the one who Nocks. No really, he’s the man responsible for feverishly cranking out your brand new Nock Co. cases. It’s awesome to see what the man behind the cases is carrying. There’s not too much of any one thing here, and it’s clear that he chose the best tool for the job. Thank you a ton for submitting Jeffrey!

You can find Jeffrey whipping up some delicious looking vegan-friendly food over at The Sunday Recipe, making all sorts of awesome goods at Bruckwicki.com, and of course bartacking away all of our pen cases at Nock Co.!

Thanks for sharing!

Screen Shot 2014-01-02 at 10.23.40 AMIf you would like to submit your Weekly Loadout of pens, ink, and paper, please share by clicking here and filling out the form!

A pen blog, focusing on high quality reivews of fountain pens, ink, mechanical pencils, and stationery.

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